Quartier Stuff, the social innovation lab of the Grünewald area of Kirchberg in Luxembourg, has recently more and more interest from both the media and the scientific community. Let's have a look at how they tell the story.

The  Paperjam article was one of the first to cover the idea of the lab. Published at the early stages of Quartier Stuff, it explained the participatory principles of the lab and its intention to involve multiple participants in an attempt to make Kirchberg - and Grünewald specifically - a better place to live, work and visit. The plan has worked – currently Quartier Stuff involves around 25 active adult participants from a variety of backgrounds and a dozen of children, supported ad hoc by multiple specialists in several domains.

The Wort article further displays the nature of Quartier Stuff in a captivating photo reportage. The lab is home to many examples of small and large initiatives that make the life and work of the quarter much more engaging for the participants. Many of these improvements and innovations are still in the making, as six teams meet almost weekly to work on prototypes aiming to shape the district.

A recent publication at infogreen.lu zooms in on this collaborative nature of the lab.  Participants are trained in the methods they are using so that not only do they come up with solutions in this lab ‘cycle’, but they will also be able to take over the lab process in the future. Quartier Stuff gives legitimacy to the undertaken initiatives: participants are not spectators but actors of the evolution of their neighbourhood, building upon 1,300 ideas collected as part of a crowdsourcing campaign held earlier this year. Decisions are always taken in groups and collaboration is simply the very essence of how the lab works.

Quartier Stuff has also been extensively featured on the radio and television. The RTL Journal has also recently covered the lab story, zooming in on the work of children who actively participate in the lab process. Indeed, as part of Quartier Stuff Minis, 12 children from Eisschoul aged from 6 to 12 years old spend their Friday afternoons in the ‘red container’ (the house of the Quartier Stuff lab), developing prototypes and advising on the projects for youth.

All this is a good example and part of a wider dynamic taking place in Luxembourg, called Third Industrial Revolution. As illustrated by the short movie titled “De Changement ass schonn am gaangen (Le changement est en cours)”, a transition is taking place towards a real paradigm shift and Luxembourg is the first country to prepare for it on a national scale. Under the joint lead of the Ministry of Economy, the Chamber of Commerce and IMS Luxembourg and in close collaboration with the American economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin, a strategy has been defined to set the new sustainable model for our country, in order to draw up guidelines for its future development. Quartier Stuff is featured in the film as a showcase of how collaborative, participatory, bottom up approaches can be a vivid accelerator of this transition.

Quartier Stuff is also attracting the attention of scholars. It has been recently featured at Stanford Social Innovation Review online as a prominent example of how innovation labs use openness for the purpose of co-creation.

Last but not least, since its inception, the lab has been active on social media. Leveraging the Quartier Stuff lively Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages, lab participants have been reaching out to the public through live streamed videos, posts, and questions. While the lab has existed for almost a year now, it’s intention has remained the same: encouraging everyone to actively shape their district. The Quartier Stuff story continues…

 

 

Quartier Stuff, the social innovation lab of the Grünewald area of Kirchberg in Luxembourg, has recently received more and more interest from both the media and the scientific community. Let’s have a look at how they tell the lab story.

The  Paperjam article was one of the first to cover the idea of the lab. Published at the early stages of Quartier Stuff, it explained the participatory principles of the lab and its intention to involve multiple participants in an attempt to make Kirchberg - and Grünewald specifically - a better place to live, work and visit. The plan has worked – currently Quartier Stuff involves around 25 active adult participants from a variety of backgrounds and a dozen of children, supported ad hoc by multiple specialists in several domains.

The Wort article further displays the nature of Quartier Stuff in a captivating photo reportage. The lab is home to many examples of small and large initiatives that make the life and work of the quarter much more engaging for the participants. Many of these improvements and innovations are still in the making, as six teams meet almost weekly to work on prototypes aiming to shape the district.

A recent publication at infogreen.lu zooms in on this collaborative nature of the lab.  Participants are trained in the methods they are using so that not only do they come up with solutions in this lab ‘cycle’, but they will also be able to take over the lab process in the future. Quartier Stuff gives legitimacy to the undertaken initiatives: participants are not spectators but actors of the evolution of their neighbourhood, building upon 1,300 ideas collected as part of a crowdsourcing campaign held earlier this year. Decisions are always taken in groups and collaboration is simply the very essence of how the lab works.

Quartier Stuff has also been extensively featured on the radio and television.

The RTL Journal has recently covered the lab story, zooming in on the work of children who actively participate in the lab process. Indeed, as part of Quartier Stuff Minis, 12 children from Eis Schoul aged from 6 to 12 years old spend their Friday afternoons in the ‘red container’ (the house of the Quartier Stuff lab), developing prototypes and advising on the projects for youth.

All this is a good example and part of a wider dynamic taking place in Luxembourg, called Third Industrial Revolution. As illustrated by the short movie titled “De Changement ass schonn am gaangen (Le changement est en cours)”, a transition is taking place towards a real paradigm shift and Luxembourg is the first country to prepare for it on a national scale. Under the joint lead of the Ministry of Economy, the Chamber of Commerce and IMS Luxembourg and in close collaboration with the American economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin, a strategy has been defined to set the new sustainable model for our country, in order to draw up guidelines for its future development. Quartier Stuff is featured in the film as a showcase of how collaborative, participatory, bottom up approaches can be a vivid accelerator of this transition.

Quartier Stuff is also attracting the attention of scholars. It has been recently featured at Stanford Social Innovation Review online as a prominent example of how innovation labs use openness for the purpose of co-creation.

Last but not least, since its inception, the lab has been active on social media. Leveraging the Quartier Stuff lively Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages, lab participants have been reaching out to the public through live streamed videos, posts, and questions. While the lab has existed for almost a year now, it’s intention has remained the same: encouraging everyone to actively shape their district. The Quartier Stuff story continues…